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Saint-Emilion Wines

Situated on the right bank of the Dordogne River, in the Libournais region of Bordeaux, Saint-Emilion is an appellation known to red wine lovers around the world. The winemaking history of...Read More

Products (448)
RP
91
JS
94
JR
16-
Clos des Jacobins 2018
Grand cru classe -  - - Red
$588.00 
$49.00 / Unit
Chateau Brun 2019
$240.00 
$20.00 / Unit
Chateau Brun 2018
$264.00 
$22.00 / Unit
RP
91
JS
90-91
WS
83
Chateau Clos de Sarpe 2012
33% off 3 cases or more
Grand cru classe -  - - Red
$1,068.00 
$89.00 / Unit
RP
94-96+
JS
94
WS
93
Chateau Sansonnet 2019
Grand cru classe -  - - Red
$540.00 
$45.00 / Unit
RP
96+
JS
98-99
WS
95
Chateau Pavie-Macquin 2019
Rare wines
1er grand cru classé "B" -  - - Red
$594.00 
$99.00 / Unit
RP
97+
JS
98
WS
96
Chateau Figeac 2018
1er grand cru classé "B" -  - - Red
$1,860.00 
$310.00 / Unit
RP
87
JS
90-91
WS
92
Chateau de Ferrand 2017
33% off 3 cases or more
Grand cru classe -  - - Red
$648.00 
$54.00 / Unit
RP
85
JS
90
BD
14.5
Couvent des Jacobins 2012
33% off 3 cases or more
Grand cru classe -  - - Red
$528.00 
$44.00 / Unit
RP
89+
JS
94-95
WS
92
Chateau de Ferrand 2019
Grand cru classe -  - - Red
$528.00 
$44.00 / Unit
RP
91
JS
94
WS
93
Chateau La Gaffeliere 2014
1er grand cru classé "B" -  - - Red
$1,008.00 
$84.00 / Unit
RP
93
JS
94-95
WS
89
Chateau La Dominique 2019
Grand cru classe -  - - Red
$1,008.00 
$84.00 / Unit
RP
96
JS
95
Chateau Beausejour Heritiers Duffau-Lagarrosse 2019
$924.00 
$154.00 / Unit
RP
92+
JS
95
WS
92
Chateau La Dominique 2018
Grand cru classe -  - - Red
$1,068.00 
$89.00 / Unit
RP
93+
JS
94
WS
90
Chateau Fombrauge 2018
Grand cru classe -  - - Red
$528.00 
$44.00 / Unit
RP
89
JS
92
WS
92
Chateau La Dominique 2017
33% off 3 cases or more
Rare wines
Grand cru classe -  - - Red
$1,188.00 
$99.00 / Unit
RP
90
JS
93
WS
93
Chateau Fombrauge 2019
Grand cru classe -  - - Red
$528.00 
$44.00 / Unit
RP
95
JS
96
WS
94
Chateau La Gaffeliere 2019
Rare wines
1er grand cru classé "B" -  - - Red
$1,068.00 
$89.00 / Unit
RP
92
JS
95-96
WS
93
Chateau Barde-Haut 2015
Grand cru classe -  - - Red
$660.00 
$55.00 / Unit
RP
96
JS
98
WS
95
Chateau Valandraud 2019
1er grand cru classé "B" -  - - Red
$1,074.00 
$179.00 / Unit
RP
87-89
JS
95
WS
94
Chateau de Ferrand 2018
Grand cru classe -  - - Red
$528.00 
$44.00 / Unit
RP
90-92
JS
93-94
Organic
Couvent des Jacobins 2019
Grand cru classe -  - - Red
$564.00 
$47.00 / Unit
RP
93
JS
93
WS
89
Organic
Chateau Grand Corbin-Despagne 2018
$588.00 
$49.00 / Unit
RP
92-94
JS
95
WS
93
Chateau Barde-Haut 2019
Grand cru classe -  - - Red
$600.00 
$50.00 / Unit
RP
87
JS
94
WS
91
Chateau La Couspaude 2018
Grand cru classe -  - - Red
$768.00 
$64.00 / Unit
RP
94
JS
93
WS
90
Chateau Clos de Sarpe 2015
Grand cru classe -  - - Red
$1,128.00 
$94.00 / Unit
RP
90-92
JS
93-94
Clos La Gaffeliere 2019
Rare wines
2nd wine of Ch. La Gaffeliere -  - - Red
$468.00 
$39.00 / Unit
RP
88-90
JS
94
WS
87
Clos des Jacobins 2016
Grand cru classe -  - - Red
$528.00 
$44.00 / Unit
RP
92
JS
94
WS
93
Chateau La Dominique 2016
Grand cru classe -  - - Red
$948.00 
$79.00 / Unit
RP
97
JS
95
WS
94
Chateau La Gaffeliere 2018
Light prices
1er grand cru classé "B" -  - - Red
$2,180.00
$1,656.00 
$1,656.00 / Unit
RP
94-96
JS
94-95
BD
91-92
Chateau Laroque 2020
Grand cru classe -  - - Red
$504.00 
$42.00 / Unit
RP
94+
JS
94
WS
93
Chateau Fleur Cardinale 2018
$708.00 
$59.00 / Unit
JS
93-94
RG
18
JR
16.5
Clos des Jacobins 2015
Grand cru classe -  - - Red
$516.00 
$43.00 / Unit
JS
93-94
BD
92-93
RVF
89-91
Chateau Laroze 2020
Grand cru classe -  - - Red
$300.00 
$25.00 / Unit
RP
93+
JS
93-94
WS
92
Chateau Barde-Haut 2016
Grand cru classe -  - - Red
$624.00 
$52.00 / Unit
RG
17
La Tour du Pin 2007
33% off 3 cases or more
$756.00 
$63.00 / Unit
JS
94-95
BD
92-93
RVF
92-93
Chateau de Ferrand 2020
Grand cru classe -  - - Red
$336.00 
$28.00 / Unit
RP
92
JS
95-96
WS
92
Chateau Fleur Cardinale 2019
$588.00 
$49.00 / Unit
RP
91-93
JS
93
WS
89
Chateau Soutard 2016
Grand cru classe -  - - Red
$828.00 
$69.00 / Unit
RP
95+
JS
96
WS
94
Chateau La Gaffeliere 2016
1er grand cru classé "B" -  - - Red
$1,068.00 
$89.00 / Unit
JS
93-94
BD
91-92
JR
15.5+
Clos des Jacobins 2020
Grand cru classe -  - - Red
$360.00 
$30.00 / Unit
RP
92-94+
JS
93-94
BD
94-95
Organic
Chateau Grand Corbin-Despagne 2020
$408.00 
$34.00 / Unit
RP
93+
JS
94
WS
94
Chateau Barde-Haut 2018
Grand cru classe -  - - Red
$708.00 
$59.00 / Unit
JS
95
WS
88
Chateau Poesia 2019
$480.00 
$40.00 / Unit
RP
90-92+
JS
92-93
BD
93-94
Chateau La Tour Figeac 2020
Grand cru classe -  - - Red
$480.00 
$40.00 / Unit
Chateau Cheval Blanc Wines
Chateau Valandraud Wines
Chateau Angelus Wines
Chateau Troplong Mondot Wines
Chateau Pavie Wines
Chateau La Gaffeliere Wines
Chateau Canon Wines
Chateau Quintus Wines
Chateau Clos de Sarpe Wines
Chateau Trotte Vieille Wines
Chateau Beausejour Wines
Chateau Barde-Haut Wines
Couvent des Jacobins Wines
Chateau Laroze Wines
Clos des Jacobins Wines
Chateau Figeac Wines
Chateau Larcis Ducasse Wines
Chateau de Ferrand Wines
Chateau Fleur Cardinale Wines
Chateau Beau-Sejour Becot Wines
Chateau Bellefont-Belcier Wines
Chateau Chauvin Wines
Chateau La Dominique Wines
Chateau Canon La Gaffeliere Wines
Chateau La Tour Figeac Wines
Chateau Grand Mayne Wines
Chateau Grand Corbin-Despagne Wines
Chateau Les Grandes Murailles Wines
Chateau Soutard Wines
Chateau Faugeres Wines
Chateau Franc Mayne Wines
Chateau Magrez Fombrauge Wines
Chateau Quinault l'Enclos Wines
Chateau La Mondotte Wines
Chateau Dassault Wines
Chateau Peby Faugeres Wines
Clos Fourtet Wines
Chateau Pavie-Macquin Wines
Chateau Villemaurine Wines
Chateau Poesia Wines
Chateau Grand Corbin Wines
Chateau Fombrauge Wines
Chateau Larmande Wines
Chateau Le Prieure Wines
Chateau Grand-Pontet Wines
Chateau Brun Wines
Chateau La Fleur Wines
Chateau La Couspaude Wines
Chateau Laroque Wines
Chateau Corbin Michotte Wines
Chateau Palais Cardinal Wines
Chateau Roylland
Chateau Balestard La Tonnelle Wines
Chateau Pavie Decesse Wines
Chateau de Pressac Wines
Chateau Bellevue Wines
Chateau Monbousquet
Chateau Corbin Wines
Chateau Cap de Mourlin
Chateau Bellevue-Mondotte
Clos de l'Oratoire
Chateau Ripeau
La Tour du Pin Wines
Chateau Sansonnet Wines
Chateau La Marzelle Wines
Chateau Belair-Monange Wines
Chateau Faurie de Souchard Wines
Chateau Ausone Wines
Chateau Cherubin
Chateau L'Arrosee Wines
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Saint-Emilion Wine | The Softer Side of Bordeaux

Surrounding the picture-perfect medieval town of Saint-Emilion on Bordeaux’s Right Bank is a dazzling mosaic of small vineyards, classified under the Saint-Emilion appellation and certified as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Here, deep limestone and clay soils create the ideal terroir for Merlot, which lends a signature softness, smoothness, and earthiness to the wines. Meanwhile, Cabernet Franc and Cabernet Sauvignon grown in Gunzian gravel to the west of the appellation make for wines with fantastic structure and poise.

Saint Emilion wine

The specific style of a Saint-Emilion will vary largely with vintage and micro-terroir of origin. Nevertheless, these wines seem to have several signature features in common: a luscious mouthfeel, silky-smooth tannins and concentrated aromas of blackberries, ripe plums, black cherries, and chocolate, which evolve into herbaceous and earthy touches of tobacco and truffles with age.

The History of the Saint-Emilion Wine Appellation

The winemaking history of the region we today call Saint-Emilion dates back to Roman times and continues through the Middle Ages. Originally called Ascumbas, the town and its surrounding land was renamed after the Benedictine monk Emilion, who settled in this area and founded the first religious community there in the 8th century.

As this area was on the route of Saint James to Santiago de Compostela, it would be frequented by religious pilgrims. Several monasteries, churches and hospices were constructed from the 11th century onwards to accommodate the latter. During the 12th century, the area fell under English rule, when Eleanor of Aquitaine married Henri Plantagenet, who would become Henry II of England. Saint-Emilion became the first growing area in Bordeaux to export its wines (mostly to England, where wine was in high demand) and Libourne was founded by the British as a commercial capital to direct this export activity.

 

Merlot grapes in Saint-Emilion wine
¬© Ch√Ęteau Fombrauge

 

In 1199, a regulatory body called the Jurade was established to supervise the quality of wines from Saint-Emilion. A few centuries later, in the 1700‚Äôs, Saint-Emilion started to adopt the concept of ‚Äúcru,‚ÄĚ which tied the characteristics of terroir to the quality of the wines from that terroir. During this time quality really began to improve and the wines of the region won the gold medal at the World Expo of 1867, followed by the Collective Grand Prize at the 1889 World Expo.

During the 19th century, the phylloxera epidemic struck the vineyards of Bordeaux. To tackle this deadly vine pest, the vineyards (which before phylloxera were planted mostly with Malbec) were replanted to Merlot grafted onto phylloxera-resistant American rootstock. In 1999, the Saint-Emilion winegrowing region and the 8 villages included under the jurisdiction of Saint-Emilion were recognized by UNESCO as a ‚Äúcultural landscape‚ÄĚ and listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Today the medieval town of Saint-Emilion draws visitors from all over the world with its beautiful monolithic church, its iconic 13th century Tour du Roy towers, its incredible labyrinth of underground limestone wine caves, and ‚Äď of course ‚Äď its world-renowned chateaux, many of which are located quite close to the town.

The Classification of Saint-Emilion Wine

The very first classification of Saint-√Čmilion wine took place in 1954, resulting in the creation of four appellations: Lussac Saint-Emilion, Puisseguin Saint-Emilion, Saint-Emilion and Saint-Emilion Grand Cru. The official classification was drawn up in 1955 (referred to as the 1955 classification of Saint-Emilion) and, unlike the 1855 classification of the Medoc, Graves and Sauternes, the classification of Saint-Emilion is updated every 10 years or so. Since then, the levels have changed to: Premier Grand Cru Class√© A (the highest level), Premier Grand Cru Class√© B and Premier Grand Cru Class√©. The most recent classification took place in 2012 and only four Sant-Emilion chateaux made the cut for Premier Grand Cru Classe A: Ch√Ęteau Cheval Blanc, Ch√Ęteau Angelus, Ch√Ęteau Ausone and Ch√Ęteau Pavie.

 

Chateau Cheval Blanc in Saint-Emilion wine
¬© Ch√Ęteau Cheval Blanc

 

Today, the Lussac-Saint-Emilion, Puisseguin-Saint-Emilion, Montagne-Saint-Emilion and Saint-Georges-Saint-Emilion appellations immediately north and northeast of AOC Saint-Emilion are considered Saint-Emilion satellite appellations.

The Saint-Emilion Wine Terroir: Cradle of World-Class Wines

The town of Saint-Emilion is situated in the Libourne district of Bordeaux on the Right Bank of the Dordogne River. The appellation today encompasses roughly 5,400 hectares (13,000 acres) of land, producing roughly 250,000 hectoliters of Bordeaux wine per year. Only red wines qualify for the Saint-Emilion appellation. This area is a dazzling mosaic of plots, divided between almost 970 registered winegrowers. And because the terroir here is so varied, each of these producers seems to have its own soil portfolio.

The climate of St-Emilion is temperate with the oceanic influences of the Atlantic, consistent rainfall throughout the growing season and hot, dry summers whose temperatures are nevertheless moderated by the nearby Isle and Dordogne Rivers. The rivers also protect the vines against spring frost by lessening temperate swings. 

 

A draft horse in the vineyards of Saint-Emilion wine
¬© Ch√Ęteau Troplong Mondot

 

Unlike the wines of the Medoc, whose blends are dominated by Cabernet Sauvignon, the wines of Saint-Emilion contain mostly Merlot and Cabernet Franc. The appellation also permits the use of Cabernet Sauvignon, Carmenere, Petit Verdot and Malbec, though these grape varieties are generally used in smaller quantities, if at all.

The predominance of Merlot, which defines the style of classic Saint-Emilion, has a lot to do with the appellation’s terroir. The soils of Saint-Emilion tend to be rich in clay, chalk and limestone, ideally suited to Merlot. The climate in most of Saint-Emilion is also considerably cooler on the Right Bank, too cool in fact to ripen Cabernet Sauvignon in time for harvest.

 

Merlot grape harvest in Saint-Emilion wine
¬© Ch√Ęteau Canon - Brice Braastad

 

The soils of Saint-Emilion are incredibly varied, including limestone, clay, gravel, and sand in different proportions throughout the appellation. Specifically, the geology of Saint-Emilion can be broken down into three main vineyard areas. Perhaps the most famous of these is the limestone plateau upon which the town itself is situated and the surrounding limestone c√ītes (or hillsides). This is where most of the best known chateaux are located, including Chateau Angelus and Chateau Troplong Mondot. Here, the limestone and clay soils produce Merlot-dominant wines with remarkable elegance, finesse, softness, and aging potential.

In the northwestern part of Saint-Emilion, we find an alluvial terrace (nicknamed the ‚ÄúGraves de Saint-Emilion‚ÄĚ) formed by glacial activity in the Quaternary period (2 million years ago). Here, the terroir is characterized by Gunzian gravel soils with fantastic drainage and ideal conditions for ripening both Cabernet Sauvignon and Cabernet Franc. These two grape varieties appear in notably higher proportions in the wines from this area, including the famous wines of Chateau Cheval Blanc and Chateau Figeac.

 

The vineyards of Ch√Ęteau Canon La Gaffeli√®re in Saint-Emilion wine
© François Poincet

 

Finally, Saint-Emilion is also home to vineyards on an alluvial plain, characterized by sandier soils. Wines produced here tend to be lighter in body.

How to Enjoy a Saint-Emilion Wine

As is true for any winegrowing area in Bordeaux (or really, anywhere else in France or the world), the specific style of a wine from Saint-Emilion will depend largely on the characteristics of its vintage and the specific micro-terroir of the vineyard that produced it. For example, wines from sandy soils tend to be lighter and more red-fruit-forward on the nose, while wines from limestone and clay soils tend to be much richer on the palate, with deeper aromas and a greater potential for age.

Nevertheless, the generalized signature style of Saint-Emilion is a Merlot-dominant wine with a luscious mouthfeel, very smooth, soft texture and concentrated, intense aromas of blackberries, ripe plums, black cherries, and chocolate. Cabernet Franc also lends to these blends a certain floral and spicy quality as well as structure and tannins. With time, the wines of Saint-Emilion can develop herbaceous and earthy notes of tobacco and truffles. When produced from high-quality limestone soils, these wines can also offer a very elegant crushed-rock minerality.

 

Harvest at Chateau Chauvin in Saint-Emilion wine
© SERGE CHAPUIS

 

As wines of Saint-Emilion are predominantly made of Merlot, they tend to, on a whole, be approachable at a younger age than the wines of the Medoc, which can be very astringent and closed with rough tannins in their youth. Nevertheless, the best wines from Saint-Emilion will age beautifully in the cellar for decades after its vintage.

The best vintages of Saint-Emilion are considered to be: 2016, 2015, 2014, 2012, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2006, 2005, 2003, 2001, 2000, 1998, 1990, 1989, 1985, 1964, 1961, 1959, 1955, 1953, 1950, 1949, 1947 and 1945.

These wines should be served at an ideal temperature of 18¬įC (64.5¬įF) and no warmer than 20¬įC (68¬įF). Some (but not all!) Saint-Emilion wines will need to be decanted to allow them to breathe a bit before tasting. Make sure to read the serving suggestions of your specific bottle before uncorking.

 

A barrel room in Saint-Emilion wine
¬© Ch√Ęteau Barde-Haut

 

The different styles of Saint-Emilion wines allow them to accompany a wide range of food pairings. Basic Saint Emilion Grand Cru wines will go nicely with rich, tomato-based pizza or pasta dishes or a duck terrine. A high-quality Saint-Emilion Grand Cru Classe with 2 to 5 years of age on it will serve as the perfect pairing to dishes like a classic entrecote a la Bordelaise, roast pigeon or Saint-Nectaire cheese. And finally, an evolved Saint Emilion Premier Grand Cru Classe A or B with 10 or more years of age on it will lend itself to a risotto or tagliatelle in a rich and creamy morel mushroom sauce, a light stew of lamb or veal, an omelet served with freshly shaved black truffles or a recipe with river fish, like the classic lamprey à la Bordelaise.

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